April 28, 2017

Quarteto em Cy - Quarteto em Cy, 1964


Originally comprised of four sisters from Bahia (Cybele, Cylene, Cynara, and Cyva; their real names), Quarteto em Cy has been enormously prolific and has also undergone many lineup changes over the years. I've been unsure which record of theirs to begin with since this blog started, so I've decided to start at the beginning and share their debut (and also their first of maybe five self-titled records), from what Brazilian music snobs consider to be their golden period (although they weren't signed to the legendary Elenco label until 1966).

Swooning vocal harmonies delivered with expressive precision and set over meandering jazz and bossa textures. No reason not to be listening to this today.


April 20, 2017

[Mix for NTS Radio] Getting Warmer Episode 12


My newest mix for NTS Radio is meant for springtime walking around. (Mom, I think you might like this one.) I'll be posting an mp3 download version in a week from now. I know it's been a little quiet around here--I've been tied up with another project, but am looking forward to sharing more music next week. If you like this, you can download an mp3 version here. Thanks for listening!



Tracklisting:
1. Bill Nelson - Wildest Dreams
2. I-Level - In The Sand
3. Isabelle Antena - How Can They Tell
4. Phill & Friends Band - This Man
5. Ayumi Ishida - Bye Bye Jet
6. Gal Costa - Sebastiana
7. Ntombi & Survival - Think More About Me (Edit)
8. Wham! - Blue (Armed With Love)
9. UB40 - Don't Break My Heart (Edit)
10. Herb Alpert - Rise
11. George McCrae - I Get Lifted
12. Boz Scaggs - Lowdown
13. Yasuko Agawa - L.A. Night
14. Stereolab - Dear Marge

April 10, 2017

Haruomi Hosono - Mercuric Dance, 1985


A favorite. Not purely an ambient record, as there are a handful of more jittery, percussive tracks in the second half, but a good deal of this is, for me, ideal music to work to. Ringing, jewel-like washes of synth, but with a certain weight that similarly intentioned records seem to be lacking. The navy blue cover feels very apt--there's something angular and a bit severe about this that I love. Recontextualized elements of traditional Japanese drumming throughout. I think this was made for a modern dance performance, but can't find any additional information online--if anyone knows, please fill us in. Enjoy.